Abnormal Psychology, 12th Edition DSM-5 Updated Version

ISBN: 9780730311423

Abnormal Psychology, 12th Edition is designed and written to help undergraduate psychology students succeed in the their Abnormal Psych or Psychopathology course. This text has been a cornerstone Abnormal Psych text for nearly forty years, and this new edition includes current research, theory and treatment, as well as updated coverage on the all new DSM-5. This is definitely a text that will support you through your degree and onto a clinical psychology career.

Features

  • Balanced coverage throughout, with a blend of research with clinical applications.
  • Comprehensive coverage of current research, theories and applications.
  • Takes a problem‐solving approach, by presenting students with the investigative process used by practicing clinicians and scientists.
  • Employs a Multiple Paradigm Approach that shows how psychopathology is best understood by considering multiple perspectives, or paradigms when suggesting treatment options.
Ann M. Kring is Professor of Psychology at the University of California at Berkeley, where she is a former Director of the Clinical Science Program and Psychology Clinic. She received her B.S. from Ball State University and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Her internship in clinical psychology was completed at Bellevue Hospital and Kirby Forensic Psychiatric Center, in New York. From 1991 to 1998, she taught at Vanderbilt University. She received a Distinguished Teaching Award from UC Berkeley in 2008. She is on the editorial board of Schizophrenia Bulletin, Journal of Abnormal Psychology, and Psychological Science in the Public Interest, an Associate”Editor for Applied and Preventive Psychology, and a former Associate Editor for Journal of Abnormal Psychology and Cognition and Emotion. She is a former member of the Executive Board of the International Society for Research on Emotion. She has won several awards, including a Young Investigator Award from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression in 1997 and the Joseph Zubin Memorial Fund Award in recognition of her research in schizophrenia in 2006. In 2005, she was named a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. Her research has been supported by grants from the Scottish Rite Schizophrenia Research program, the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, and the National Institute of Mental Health. She is a co-editor (with Denise Sloan) of the book Emotion Regulation and Psychopathology (Guilford Press) and is the author on more than 70 articles and chapters. Her current research focus is on emotion and psychopathology, with a specific interest in the emotional features of schizophrenia, assessing negative symptoms in schizophrenia, and the linkage between cognition and emotion in schizophrenia.

Sheri Johnson is Professor of Psychology at the University of California at Berkeley, where she directs the Cal Mania (Calm) program, and is a visiting professor at the University of Lancaster, England. She received her B.A. from Salem College and her Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. She completed an internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Brown University, and she was a clinical assistant professor at Brown from 1993 to 1995. From 1995 to 2008, she taught in the Department of Psychology at the University of Miami, where she was recognized three times with the Excellence in Graduate Teaching Award. In 1993, she received the Young “Investigator Award from the National Alliance for Research in Schizophrenia and Depression. She is an Associate Editor for Applied and Preventive Psychology, and she serves on the editorial board for Psychological Bulletin and International Journal of Cognitive Therapy. She is a member of the Executive Board for the Society for Research in Psychopathology and a Fellow of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research and the Association for Psychological Science. For the past 25 years, her work has focused on understanding the factors that predict the course of mania and depression. She uses social, psychological, and neurobiological paradigms to understand these processes. Her work has been funded by the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression and by the National Institute of Mental Health. She has published over 100 articles and chapters, and her findings have been published in leading journals such as the Journal of Abnormal Psychology and the American Journal of Psychiatry. She is co-editor of several books, including Psychological Treatment of Bipolar Disorder (Guilford Press).

Gerald C. Davidson is Professor of Psychology at the University of Southern California. Previously he was Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at USC and served also as Director of Clinical Training. He recently served as Dean of the USC Davis School of Gerontology. He earned his B.A. in social relations from Harvard and his Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, a Charter Fellow of the “Association for Psychological Science, and a Distinguished Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Among his other honors are the USC Associates Award for Excellence in Teaching, and the Outstanding Educator Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Among his more than 150 publications is his book Clinical Behavior Therapy, co-authored in 1976 with Marvin Goldfried and reissued in expanded form in 1994. It is one of two publications that have been recognized as Citation Classics by the Social Sciences Citation Index. He is also on the editorial board of several professional journals. His research has emphasized experimental and philosophical analyses of psychopathology, assessment, therapeutic change, and the relationships between cognition and a variety of behavioral and emotional problems via his articulated thoughts in simulated situations paradigm.

John M. Neale “was Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, retiring in 2000. He received his B.A. from the University of Toronto and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. He won numerous awards, including the American Psychological Association’s Early Career Award (1974), the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Psychological Association’s Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology (1991), and the Sustained Mentorship Award from the Society for Research in Psychopathology (2011). Besides his numerous articles in professional journals, he published books on the effects of televised violence on children, research methodology, schizophrenia, case studies in abnormal psychology, and psychological influences on health. Schizophrenia was a major focus of his research, and he also conducted research on the influence of stress on health.

1. Introduction and Historical Overview
2. Current Paradigms in Psychopathology
3. Diagnosis and Assessment
4. Research Methods in Psychopathology
5. Mood Disorders
6. Anxiety Disorders
7. Obsessive-Compulsive Related and Trauma-Related Disorders
8. Dissociative Disorders and Somatic Symptom Disorders
9. Schizophrenia
10. Substance Use Disorders
11. Eating Disorders
12. Sexual Disorders
13. Disorders of Childhood
14. Late Life and Neurocognitive Disorders
15. Personality and Personality Disorders
16. Legal and Ethical Issues
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